Find us on Social Media


Volume 14 No. 7

Moon Rise 6.16.22 above – taken by Steve Woodhead

There were more boats on the water this past weekend – but it is still quiet and still (for the most part!). One by one, the cottages are being opened, more flags are flying, and in the evening, the loons can be heard across the waters. Ahhhhh!

The pollen (pictured above) was heavy this past week – but the winds on Friday and Saturday seemed to have lightened the load on the trees.

Do check out the linked events seen below (in red and underlined) for dates and times and, when asked, for sign-ups: Triathlon/Duathlon, Learn to Sail, and Learning with Oshkinigig!!!


In this eBlast:

JUNE – JULY 1

PaBIA

OF INTEREST

  • Abandoned Dock Clean Up 
  • Why the 2022 Waste Bylaws Matter in Dollars and Sense?
  • Township Asks All Ratepayers to Reduce, Recycle and Divert
  • PaB Library at the Community Centre – Summer hours
  • Asian Jumping Worms – Invasive Species ALERT
  • GBLT – Who and What is It?
  • Lake Michigan-Huron Water Levels – June 16, 2022
  • Found Sunfish with OH license
  • In Memoriam – Alan Veale
  • Yearbook Update 2022

June – July 1 2022

Sailing Tune-Up Race Saturday, June 25th

2:00 pm

Come join fellow PaBIA sailing enthusiasts for the Tune-Up Race on Saturday, June 25th on the Middle Reach Course. The start time is 2 pm…so come join the fun!

There will not be a hosted rendezvous but please BYOBeverage/Snack to the Sailing Back Beach at the Ojibway Club – The site of the New Sailing Clinics being offered this summer.

If you haven’t been a part of this fun group and would like to know about it or even join a crew for the race; or would like to be a part of the Sailing eBlasts that are sent out with additional sailing information regarding the sailing programs this summer, please get in touch with Margie Wheler, our PaBIA Sailing Commodore!

Summer must be here…Sailing is back in full swing!


PaB Station Canada Day 2022

PaBIA

Register NOW for
PaBIA Sailing Clinics at the Ojibway Club
for 13 – 73+ years

PaBIA Sailing Clinics at the Ojibway are being held on 5 weekends this summer (4 Learn to Sail in July and 1 Learn to Race in August; all 10:00 am-1:45 p.m.). Come sail with us this summer!

Learn to Sail:

Saturdays, July 9 & 16 10:00 am – 1:45 pm

Sundays, July 24 & 31 10:00 am – 1:45 pm

Learn to Race

Saturday, August 6 10:00 am – 1:45 pm

Registration is now open for the PaBIA Sailing Clinics at the Ojibway. Sign up for one or more, and if you sign up for the entire series of 4 Learn to Sail clinics, you’ll receive the Learn to Race free!


14 New PaBIA Markers are now in Place

Over the past 3 years, PaBIA has been testing new, larger, permanent markers. These markers are much easier to see, do not need to be taken in and put out each year, and meet all the standards set by the Canadian Coast Guard. As of last fall, 14 of the old markers had been replaced with new markers. This past winter, all 14 held fast to their mooring anchors and did not drift. This is good news as it shows that we have learned how to properly anchor them out in the Open, and that it is feasible to replace more of the older small wooden markers with the new larger ones. The PaBIA Maps and Markers Committee will be working over the summer to develop a long-term strategy for replacing old markers. Stay tuned for further updates later this year! Comments/Questions: Contact Tom Cavers


Let’s All Get Onboard with our PFDs!

Starting July 1st, if you get “caught” wearing your PFD by one of our On-Water Safety Ambassadors, you’ll get a FREE Desmasdon’s Ice Cream Cone Voucher pictured here. PLUS you’ll then have a chance to enter PaBIA’s contest to win great prizes including an outside grill donated by Desmasdons or a Swift kayak!


Abandoned Dock Clean Up 

PaBIA needs your help! We are hoping to engage our community to help IDENTIFY and VOLUNTEER in the removal of unsightly and potentially very dangerous abandoned docks on our shorelines. The Township of the Archipelago has agreed to waive disposal fees and help disassemble the docks once delivered to the station.

IDENTIFY: If you know of any derelict docks, please send the specific location and, if possible, a photo to Cath Fairlie.

What is an abandoned dock? It is NOT your neighbor’s dock pulled up for winter storage! To avoid this possibility, if you think you know of a derelict dock, please take a picture and send it to your neighbours before reporting it to Cath Fairlie!

A derelict dock is usually broken up, damaged and possibly has been floating loose or up on shore for some time. A good example looks like this:

As a special incentive, one cottager was able to recycle cedar wood from an old dock to build a new deck for his cottage. A little work to run the wood through a planer netted a $3 – $4K, savings! So, if you find an abandoned dock, check to see if the wood is cedar and maybe it can be re-used rather than disposed of!

VOLUNTEER: The Township will dispose of them, but WE need to get them to the Station. PaBIA is looking for Community Volunteers to help out on “Abandoned Dock Day” (date in late August to be confirmed). Sign Up by calling (647-545-9283) or emailing the Marine Patrol

Coming in July

Put it on your calendars now! The Triathlon is back – along with the new Duathlon (no swimming) on Saturday July 16th at 9 am. Sign ups are encouraged NOW

Township of the Archipelago

Why the 2022 Waste Bylaw Matters in Dollars and Sense?

LANDFILL ECONOMICS | Our Choice

  • Residents, Staff, and Council have a clear choice to make in the future of waste management.
  • We must modernize waste management and adopt new measures or raise taxes and plan for the worst – a new landfill site

NEW LANDFILL IN 19 YEARS OR NEW WASTE BYLAW?

It will cost $14m to establish a new landfill site, and this is a conservative estimate. There will be costs of $500,000 to $800,000 an acre to prepare a site for landfill operation to meet Provincial waste and environmental regulations. The cost of public hearings, environmental studies, legal fees, and other procedures are in addition to these estimates.

Result: Significant tax increase and increase in reserves.

Or

  • Modernize waste management with new tools and technology
  • Divert waste effectively and efficiently
  • Extend the life of Site 9 by another 20 years minimum while new technologies come online
  • Protect and Preserve our Environment
  • Reduce Carbon Emissions and meet Climate Change targets.

Result: Lifespan of Site 9 Extended Beyond 19 years (2060 or Bust!)

Bottom-line: The 2022 Waste Bylaw extends the life of Site 9 while the alternative will result in a huge cost to the community.

REDUCE | RECYCLE | DIVERT – Manage Waste Efficiently

Township Asks All Ratepayers to Reduce, Recycle and Divert

The 2022 Waste Bylaw recognizes the majority of residents who responsibly manage waste. The modest user of waste management services and those that follow the waste bylaw will experience little change.

The Waste Audit Report identified waste streams that require active management by

the Township and its residents. In addition, many residents have identified wet waste as an area where the Township can improve significantly.

The report confirms that more must be accomplished to reduce the mixing of waste, and new solutions for dealing with wet waste where it originates are required today:

  • Household garbage contains 24% recyclable waste (See what recyclables are)
  • Organic Waste is the highest waste component – 31% at Site 9
  • Great surprise in Coffee Pod waste –13% at PaB Transfer Station versus 7% at Site 9
  • Tissue and paper toweling is 3% of waste; can be easily backyard composted.

Be part of the solution! The ToA wants everyone to consider buying a food waste dehydration unit and is presently focusing on the FoodCycler product.

We Can DO BETTER | No Time TO WASTE

OF INTEREST

ASIAN JUMPING WORMS – Invasive Species ALERT

 thanks to Jan Vanderwal for bringing this to our attention!

What is an “Asian Jumping Worm”?

  • An earthworm that has been seen recently in parts of southern Ontario.
  • They are considered non-native and therefore invasive.
  • They are distinguished by the lighter coloured ring around the body, near the head.
  • Their defensive behaviour when threatened is to wiggle their bodies wildly.

Where have they been found?

  • They are widespread in the US.
  • They have been spotted in Essex County and in the Toronto, Dundas and Wheatley areas.
  •  Not much more is know about their spread but it is being monitored.

Why should we be concerned?

  • Jumping Worms multiple and move rapidly.
  • They could threaten other species in the ecosystem and many species of plants, including Trilliums.
  • Once they take hold in an area, it is almost impossible to remove them.
  • They can rearrange the organic level of soil from the top of the forest to the bottom.
  • In the Boreal forest, this means that more carbon dioxide would be emitted into the atmosphere than is currently absorbed by the forest.
  • This constitutes a serious threat to climate change.

What can I do?

  • Prevention is key!
  • Avoid moving compost or soil out of your immediate area.
  • Inspect the soil and plants you purchase.
  • Purchase bulk mulch or compost that has been heat-treated.
  • Dispose of leftover worms used for fishing in your garden (not the forest or green spaces).
  • Report any sightings here
  • If you find one or more, destroy them.

For more detail check these online articles: CornellToronto City NewsCBC news


PaB Library at the Community Centre

Jane Manning-Marshall and Dawn Gagne are volunteer librarians at the Pointe au Baril Library and they would love to invite all summer residents to come in, browse, discuss and borrow books!

For everyone’s convenience, there is a dropbox for books that are returned outside library hours.

The library is also connected digitally to the Parry Sound Public Library system. 

Summer Hours at the Pointe au Baril Library in the Community Centre.

Monday – 9:30 am to 11: 30 am

Wednesday – 9:30 am – 11: 30 am


Who and What IS GBLT? Take a Look at this Video!

The Georgian Bay Land Trust is a registered charity dedicated to protecting wilderness lands and species throughout eastern Georgian Bay. Their 67 conservation properties stretch from Port Severn to the North Channel and include 16 in Pointe au Baril. These places provide recreational opportunities for communities, protect key habitats for species at risk, and offer sites for education and conservation research. Listen in the video below:

Found / Yearbook Updates / In Memoriam as of June 22

Found

This sunfish OH7724 is still looking for its owner. Found on Mayne – now on Pawis Island – please contact Nancy for further details.


With each eBlast, we will provide you a list of names of those members who have provided updated contact information. The details of all the changes since the 2022 yearbook came out in late April are provided in THIS printable format for you to print out and insert into your own Yearbook! As of June 9, here are the changes.

Grant, Susan & Fitzgerald, Bob (address change)

Thomson, Mary Dawn (email change)


In Memoriam

Alan Veale, A30 – 48 ‘Old Steamboat on Tonches Is.’, husband of Janet (nee Gray), father of Jennifer (Luc) Boucher and Lesley (Cory Repta), June 2022.

Water Levels

Lakes Michigan/Huron Water Levels Jun 16, 2022 To better read the charts, please click on the chart for the Daily or Six Month Forecast Water level chart and the corresponding websites


Please support PaBIA’s Yearbook Advertisers 2022

1-800-263-5055

This site’s advertising feature was created to provide assistance for special local information &events for existing Yearbook advertisers only.

Click on the logo to go to the website


\